DRUM BATTLE OF THE CENTURY: DON’T MISS THIS!!!!

elvin jones max roach art blakey drum battle part 1c

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THE PLAYERS:

1) ELVIN JONES

Elvin Ray Jones was born September 9, 1927 in Pontiac, Michigan, the youngest of ten children. By age 13, determined to be a drummer, Elvin was practicing eight to ten hours a day. He went nowhere without drum sticks in his pocket, and would beat out rhythms on any available surface. Early influences Elvin likes to cite range from Kenny Clarke, Max Roach and Jo Jones to parade drummers and the American Legion Drum Corps! I

After a brief gig at the Detroit club Grand River Street, he went to work at another club, backing up such jazz greats as Parker, Davis and Wardell Grey.Jones came to New York in 1955 for an unsuccessful audition for the Benny Goodman band but stayed in the city, joining Charlie Mingus’ band and making a record called “J is Jazz.” In 1960, he became a member of John Coltrane’s quartet. Jones, with his rhythmic, innovative style, became one of jazz’s most famous drummers under Coltrane. He can be heard on Coltrane’s “A Love Supreme” and “Coltrane Live at the Village Vanguard.” After leaving the Coltrane quartet, Jones briefly played with Duke Ellington and formed the Elvin Jones’ Jazz Machine. He put out several solo albums and continued to tour, including last month in Oakland, California, Keiko Jones said.

Elvin has been heard on nearly 500 recordings, with no end in sight. He also made a temporary detour to Hollywood in 1971 to appear as the character Job Cain in the ABC Paramount film “Zachariah”. Reflecting his deep commitment to the music (“Playing is not something I do at night” he said, “It’s my function in life”).
MORE INFO:
http://www.drummerworld.com/drummers/Elvin_Jones.html

THE PASSION OF ELVIN JONES:

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2) MAX ROACH:

Max Roach is a renowned American percussionist and composer. He was born in the year of 1925 in New Land, North Carolina, but he began his extensive career at the age of ten when he began playing drums in Brooklyn, New York for gospel music groups. These gospel groups proved to contribute the most significant influence to his musical style. He also studied at the Manhattan School of Music.

At Monroe’s Uptown House, a nightclub in Harlem, New York, Max Roach began working with a group of American jazz musicians (including pianist Thelonius Monk and alto saxophonist Charlie Parker) in 1942. These talented musicians were experimenting with a musical style that was to become known as bebop jazz, or bop. At the time, drummer Kenny Clarke was introducing stylistic innovations and was performing with many of the top bebop musicians. These innovations included utilizing the cymbals rather than the bass drum for the primary rhythmic pulse of the music. Roach was the first to fully realize the potential of these innovations and quickly developed his own style to become the leading drummer of the bop movement (early 1940s to mid-1950s). He played and recorded with most of the major jazz musicians of the period, including American tenor saxophonist Coleman Hawkins and American trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie. From 1947 to 1949 he was a member of Charlie Parker’s historic bebop quintet. From 1954 to 1956 Roach led a jazz quintet with American trumpeter Clifford Brown.

MORE ON MAX ROACH, CLICK HERE:

MAX ROACH: Chillin’ With Abbey Lincoln, Lookin Fly!

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ART BLAKEY AND THE JAZZ MESSENGERS:

The origins of the Messengers are in a series of groups led or co-led by Blakey and pianist Horace Silver, though the name was not used on the earliest of their recordings. The most celebrated of these early records (credited to “The Art Blakey Quintet”), is A Night at Birdland from February 1954,[citation needed] one of the earliest commercially released “live” jazz records. This featured Silver, Blakey, the young trumpeter Clifford Brown, alto saxophonist Lou Donaldson and bassist Curly Russell. The “Jazz Messengers” name was first used on a 1954 recording nominally led by Silver, with Blakey, Hank Mobley, Kenny Dorham and Doug Watkins ā€” the same quintet would record The Jazz Messengers at the Cafe Bohemia the following year, still as a collective. Donald Byrd replaced Dorham, and the group recorded an album called simply The Jazz Messengers for Columbia Records in 1956. Blakey took over the group name when Silver left after the band’s first year (taking Mobley, Byrd and Watkins with him to form a new quintet with a variety of drummers), and the band was known as “Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers” from then onwards.

Two of the group’s most famous lineups featured Wayne Shorter on saxophone. The first was a quintet that existed from 1959 to 1961 and included Blakey, Shorter, Jymie Merritt, Lee Morgan, and Bobby Timmons. The second (1961ā€“1964) was a sextet that added trombonist Curtis Fuller and replaced Morgan and Timmons with Freddie Hubbard and Cedar Walton, respectively. Shorter was the musical director of the group, and many of his original compositions such as “Lester Left Town” remained staples of Blakey’s repertoire even after Shorter’s departure. (Other players over the years made permanent marks on Blakey’s repertoire ā€” Timmons, composer of “Dat Dere” and “Moanin'”, Benny Golson, composer of “Along Came Betty” and “Are You Real”, and, later, Bobby Watson.) Shorter’s more experimental inclinations pushed the band at the time into an engagement with the 1960s “New Thing”, as it was called: the influence of Coltrane’s contemporary records on Impulse! is evident on Free For All (1964), often cited as the greatest document of the Shorter-era Messengers (and certainly one of the most fearsomely powerful examples of hard bop on record).

MORE ON ART BLAKEY CLICK HERE

ART BLAKEY’s “Afro-Lick”:

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~ by Dudegotchops on October 19, 2007.

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